Sunday, September 11, 2022

Dave Starky V and Riverside's The Whatt Four - Hippie Love Turbo Radio Show - Code Word "Finger Lime"

This episode of Hippie Love Turbo, on KUCR 88.3 FM was a little bit of a contrast to last week's shorter songs, with a few tracks reaching past the 3-minute mark. We got a little more psyched out but still kept it in the garage.

 

The first group you heard was Dave Starky V with their song Hey Everybody which has appeared on a few garage rock compilations over the years. According to their Discogs biography they also played under the name Just Us after holding a contest on KNUZ (which currently plays country music) where the audience gave the band a new name. Funny enough, one of the more complete biographies I found for the band was on the Swedish Amazon page for their release At It Again, which features their original Hey Everybody/Stand There single, as well as, a few covers recorded in 2013. It appears that the group and some of the members continued playing music well into the 2010's which can be seen through the jsmsws YouTube channel. I believe that the jsmsws account was maintained by the Dave Starky V's original bassist and later rhythm guitarist Joe Muscanere who passed away in 2021. If anyone out there has more information on the group or Joe Muscanere, be sure to reach out.

As the show continued you heard a band from Riverside known as The Whatt Four. There's a great post on Garage Hangover that explores the band's history where members share tidbits about what the psych scene was like out here.

Anywho, that's about it for this episode's summary. Thanks for reading the blog and be sure to listen over the air on KUCR 88.3FM on Saturdays at 9pm PST. You can also listen through KUCR.org, Radio Garden, or Tune-In

You can check out this week's playlist below:


 

Saturday, September 3, 2022

Some Edmonton Bands, Steve Jobs and The New Orleans Pop Festival - Hippie Love Turbo Radio Show - Code Word "Prickly Pear"

On this episode of Hippie Love Turbo, on KUCR 88.3 FM I crammed in over 20 garage rock tracks with most of them clocking in under 3 minutes. Just the way I like it.

First off, we started this episode with The King-Beezz's song Now. The group is from Edmonton in Alberta, Canada and began their journey while the British Invasion was in full swing. What I thought was particularly cool about the band is that they were essentially formed due to a listener/musician that called their local radio station to talk about music, particularly the aforementioned British Invasion. Their official website seems to be offline but there's a pretty good summary of the group's history on a website named Citizen Freak which has some neat articles about other Canadian bands as well. 

Ashton Kutcheras Steve Jobs in Jobs

After the King-Beezz, you heard The Brymers' most popular song, Sacrifice, which was featured on the 2013 film Jobs starring Ashton Kutcher. The Brymers only put out a few singles during their peak, however, they actually recorded more songs which weren't officially released for several decades. According to the band's now defunct website, they had no idea that their music was still being listened to until drummer, Dick Lee, searched for the band's name online and found a few posts about the group. Eventually this led to the release of their remaining material through a collaboration with 60sgaragebands.com

As the show continued you heard another group from Edmonton, known as, The New Wing. The New Wing was actually the band's second name after they relocated to Bakersfield. The name change came about once the group, then known as Sons of Adam, became aware of another California transplant band that shared the same name. You heard the Sunset Strip based Sons of Adam on the episode named Sugar-Apple. Much like Sam The Sham or The Escapades, The New Wing also drove around in a converted hearse. Spooky. 

And finally, you heard Gulfport, Mississippi's The Flower Power perform their song You Make Me Fly. The band is probably best known for being the opening performer on the second day of the New Orleans Pop Festival in August of '69. The festival was in Prairieville, Louisiana and happened weeks after Woodstock but, unlike Woodstock, the local authorities came down hard on attendees with narcotics. Much like the Altamont Free Concert, which was also held at a speedway, the security mainly consisted of motorcycle clubs. I'm not sure how many concerts before the New Orleans Pop Festival used motorcycle clubs as security but I do know the practice seemed to disappear after the stabbing of Meredith Hunter.

And that's about it for this episode's summary. Thanks for reading the blog and be sure to listen over the air on KUCR 88.3FM on Saturdays at 9pm PST. You can also listen through KUCR.org, Radio Garden, or Tune-In

You can check out this week's playlist below:


 

San Bernardino's The Good Feelins and The Pattens - Hippie Love Turbo Radio Show - Code Word "Cassava"

This episode of Hippie Love Turbo , on KUCR 88.3 FM had some more obscure stuff as I've been finding myself getting lost in some out-of...